8 Things Asian Americans Should Be Doing During the Pandemic

Many of you are either working from home, have cabin fever with multiple generations under the same roof, overwhelmed with the non-stop COVID-19 news being shoved in your eyes and ears or bored with no sports to watch or events to look forward to. Here are a few suggestions to maintain your sanity and support AAPI businesses during these tough times.

  1. Check in on your friends & family

During these times, it is a good idea to check in on your friends and family. Call your mom. Facetime the friends you’d usually be out with on a Friday night. You can even be creative with how you hangout by playing games or watching a movie together via Netflix Party Google Chrome extension

2. Take a social break by reading a book by AAPI authors

For those of you brave enough to check, your smartphone screen time is likely at an all time high, as all everything from work, social life to sports has taken a pause. As mentioned before, the COVID-19 news and daily attacks towards Asians around the world can be overwhelming. Tune out by reading a book.

Looking for some new books to read. Here are a few suggestions by AAPI authors featuring AAPI characters.

3. Support your favorite AAPI restaurant & businesses

It is an especially tough time for restaurants. times are tough. Before you head out to a chain restaurant for take out or a fast food a drive thru, check and see if your favorite Asian restaurant is still open. If you’re reading this, you already know that you cannot get COVID-19 from eating Chinese food. 

Many small restaurants are struggling. Those who haven’t already shut their doors are doing take out or delivery only. Some restaurants are selling bulk items that are hard to find in grocery stores; like bread, beans, veggies, etc. to help keep their doors open. Depending on the state, some bars are doing take out as well.

Many ethic markets are still open and often have more inventory and shorter lines than the big box chains. Check if your gym is renting out equipment so that you can workout at home.

Additionally, buy a gift certificate if you can and if you can afford to, tip generously. As with everything, only leave your house If you’re in good health and practice social distancing.

Gold House as teamed up with a few Asian founded food and beverage businesses to offer exclusive discounts goldrush.market

See how COVID-19 as impacted Manhattan’s Chinatown. 


4. Stream programs featuring Asian American talent

Chances are you’re already doing this. Even if you’ve finished Netflix and watched Always Be My Maybe 20x in the past month, there is Fresh off the Boat on Hulu 

Looking to get your mind off all the things going on in the world? Check out Ronnie Cheng, Jokoy and Allie Wong’s stand up specials.

There’s plenty of binge worthy shows out there with AAPI talent and of course there’s always Asian dramas and anime.

Don’t forget to check out our original content on YouTube.

5. Call out racism

If you see something, say something. Racist attacks towards Asians are on the rise around the world. It is important that you stay safe out there, watch for others and call out racism whether you see it in person or online.

Due to the overwhelming amount of incidents Nextshark has created an Incident Report

6. Check out these AAPI artists & podcasts

Whether you’re using this quarantine time for doing some spring cleaning or working on a passion projecting, you can play some music in the background. Get familiar with these AAPI artists and playlists.

88Rising and Traktavist both focus on up and coming Asian American artists.

Looking for something thought provoking. Check out these AAPI podcasts. 

Some of our favorites:

Asian Enough – Hosted by LA Times columnists Jen Yamato and Frank Shyong, this podcast invites celebrity guests to share their personal stories and unpack identity on their own terms.

The Dave Chang Show – Chef Dave Chang of Momofuku restaurants and host of Netflix’s Ugly Delicious, brings in guests for a smart, thought provoking podcast.

Asian, Not Asian – Fubi Abe and Mic Nguyen talk about Asian American issues that no American cares about…the Asian adoptee experience, coming out of the closet, low voter turn out among Asian Americans and more!

$6.99 per Pound – $6.99/lb is a homage to New York’s Korean owned hot food delis. The hosts Joanne Park & Jaeki Cho interview Asian Americans from all advocates to media personalities and more “treat listeners to a buffet of HOT takes on career, culture and community”

Fun with Dumb – Rapper, actor and now podcaster Dumbfounded brings his friends from the creative arts to discuss what it’s like to be Asian in the creative industry and what is means to represent Asian Americans in entertainment industry. With guests like Awkwafina, Bobby Hundreds and Chef Roy Choi, you know there will be some interesting conversations.

7. Get to know the people you live with

If you’re living with roommates or family members, get out of your room and spend some time with them. If you/they are willing to, ask some questions, watch a show together, cook a meal for each other, etc. Strengthening the bond between the people you’re sharing a roof with could be the best thing to come out of being stuck at home.

8. Get in touch with your culture

Haven’t you always wanted to learn how to make your favorite Asian dish? Now is the time! As your relatives for some recipes and pick up ingredients from the Asian market.

If you already know how to make it, experiment with adding your own touch to the recipe or show someone else how to make it to hand down the tradition. 

Living with someone who is/isn’t the same culture as you? Learn about each other’s culture or put them onto things about your own.

During this time, we need each other more than ever. Doing things like checking in on each other, supporting small businesses and staying at home can go a long way to help flatten the curve. Doing your part can slow the rate of transmission, protect those who are more vulnerable to COVID-19, strengthen relationships and create a better version of yourself.