GOLD HOUSE LAUNCHES BOOK CLUB TO ANCHOR AND EXPLORE ASIAN AMERICAN IDENTITY WITH LEADING WRITERS AND SCHOLARS

Los Angeles, CA – Gold House, the non-profit collective of Asian and Pacific Islander cultural leaders behind movements like #GoldOpen, is launching its inaugural Book Club on October 1st to uncover and codify Asian identity through other artistic mediums. After a successful pilot event with The Joy Luck Club this summer – which featured author Amy Tan with every Joy Luck Club daughter from the feature film (Lauren Tom, Ming-Na Wen, Rosalind Chao, and Tamlyn Tomita) – Gold House is formalizing the Book Club as a series of curated book lists and virtual events to help Asian Americans better understand their identity and culture in today’s political and social climate. 

The inaugural Book Club List features six books selected through a rigorous process with the help of an Advisory Council of leading Asian American writers, activists, and academics, including Amy Tan, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Viet Thanh Nguyen, and many of the nation’s leading Asian American Studies professors.

One book will be featured each month beginning in October with Jose Antonio Vargas’ Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen in honor of Filipino American History Month. Each List will also feature a selection of Asian American children’s books to help families highlight diverse stories in the early stages of their children’s development. The live virtual events will expand on both to engage the community in identity-driven conversations, ranging from an interactive children’s story hour to panel discussions—featuring the selected authors as well as members of the Advisory Council.

“This has been a year of reckoning for race in America, and many APIs have re-examined what it means to be Asian American. We recognized this unique and galvanizing opportunity to create space for our community to explore the issues that inform our identity by leveraging the rich catalog of stories written by API authors. We’re excited to contribute these moments of discussion and introspection while highlighting our representation in the literary landscape,” Gold House Book Club Director Cindy Joung said. 

Gold House’s Book Club aims to continue important conversations around identity by exploring critical themes raised in each of the books, including immigration, intersectional identities, and generational and bi-cultural differences.

Find more information about Gold House’s Book Club and how you can participate at www.goldhouse.org/bookclub.